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The Winter Solstice

The Winter Solstice D4ngzh# 冬至  (Dec. 22) December 22rd is the Dongzhi Festvial (冬至), celebrated throughout China and East Asia. Known as Winter Solstice in English, Dongzhi translates directly as “The mid of Winter,” and traditionally marks the day of the year where the sunlight is at its weakest. It’s usually one of the year’s […]

12·29·2010

The Winter Solstice

The Winter Solstice D4ngzh# 冬至  (Dec. 22) December 22rd is the Dongzhi Festvial (冬至), celebrated throughout China and East Asia. Known as Winter Solstice in English, Dongzhi translates directly as “The mid of Winter,” and traditionally marks the day of the year where the sunlight is at its weakest. It’s usually one of the year’s […]

12·29·2010
The Winter Solstice
D4ngzh#
冬至  (Dec. 22)
December 22rd is the Dongzhi Festvial (冬至), celebrated throughout China and East Asia. Known as Winter Solstice in English, Dongzhi translates directly as “The mid of Winter,” and traditionally marks the day of the year where the sunlight is at its weakest. It’s usually one of the year’s coldest days.
Like many festivals, the Chinese often celebrate Dongzhi together with their families. What people eat generally depends on where they come from: Southern Chinese traditionally eat glutinous balls of rice flour stuffed with some type of sweet filling such as brown sugar or red-bean paste (汤圆t`ngyu1n), while the northern Chinese eat wonton soup, known in Chinese as huntun (馄饨).  – K.D.

December 22nd is the Dongzhi Festvial (冬至), celebrated throughout China and East Asia. Known as Winter Solstice in English, Dongzhi translates directly as “The mid of Winter,” and traditionally marks the day of the year where the sunlight is at its weakest. It’s usually one of the year’s coldest days.

Like many festivals, the Chinese often celebrate Dongzhi together with their families. What people eat generally depends on where they come from: Southern Chinese traditionally eat glutinous balls of rice flour stuffed with some type of sweet filling such as brown sugar or red-bean paste (汤圆 tāngyuán), while the northern Chinese eat wonton soup, known in Chinese as huntun (馄饨).  – K.D.