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“Plants Vs. Zombies 2 Will Change China” Mock Ad

The ingenious PVZ2 mock ad wonderfully demonstrates Chinese youth and internet culture

08·15·2013

“Plants Vs. Zombies 2 Will Change China” Mock Ad

The ingenious PVZ2 mock ad wonderfully demonstrates Chinese youth and internet culture

08·15·2013

Sounding like the trashiest of genre flicks, mobile phone game Plants vs. Zombies 2 has caused a bit of a storm. Tencent, the Chinese internet giant has partnered up with EA and Popcap to deliver Chinese gamers their own exclusive special edition of the popular game.  Its release has, as TECHINASIA put it, “hurt the feelings of the Chinese people.” TECHINASIA said:

“The Chinese version of Plants vs. Zombies 2 (PVZ2) is significantly more difficult than its English counterpart (only available in New Zealand and Australia at present). According to players, this difficulty bump is intended to force them to shell out for in-app purchases in order to make progress. In-app purchases are also considerably more expensive than in previous editions. Whereas unlocking six special plants in the original Plants Vs Zombies cost RMB 108 ($17.50), a similar in-app purchase in the sequel costs a whopping RMB 256 ($41.50).”

In a spur of inspirational anger, netizen @天才小熊猫 created a 恶搞 (ègǎo, originated from the Japanese kuso) parody promotional video. The video, in the form of screenshots, ingeniously combines criticism of the Chinese PvZ2, Chinese popular culture, Chinglish, all in the spirit  the spirit of E Gao. The names of the 资深玩家 senior gamer and the game’s designer in the video are James • Wang Fugui and Steve • Jianguo (Steve J. perhaps?), these are made up of popular English names and typical Chinese names (Wang Rich and Nation Build).  Netizen @天才小熊猫 was clearly very angered by the games creators, and really went to town on them, making them look like, well, money-grabbing bastards.

The English subtitles in the video are not directly translated from the Chinese, but instead are part of common internet slang, where sentences are constructed of both Chinese and English conflated.We explain in the captions below:

fan zheng is 反正, which means anyhow, all the same, etc.

fan zheng is 反正, which means anyhow, all the same, etc.

In Chinese, it is how "Wow~ Amazing!" would sound if written in characters. In English, "wo le ga da cao" is 我了个大操, a vulgar phrase used to express surprise.

In Chinese, it is what, “Wow~ Amazing!” would sound like if written in characters. In English, “wo le ga da cao” is 我了个大操, is a vulgar phrase used to express surprise, similar to “OMFG”.

"Really Bladder Explosion le" is a direct translation. Diao Bao (penis explode) is a slang for stunning, blowing away.

“Really Bladder Explosion le” is a direct translation. Diao Bao (penis exploding) is a slang for stunning, amazing.

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Lou Zhu, 楼主, is internet slang meaning OP — Original Poster.

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不夸张 means unexaggerated. Chiuniubility is from the word 吹牛 (chuīniú, boast) and a word structure that is a spin off of “zhuangbility” and “geilivable“. Jue bi is 绝逼,  vulgar slang similar to “abso-f*cking-lutely”.

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NB is abbreviated from “niubi” 牛逼, a slang that means “awesome”.

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The guy is from Gag Manga Biyori, a Japanese parody manga. His face is used for the most popular memes on the Chinese net. “2” comes from Beijing slang, which means “silly” or “stupid”.

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“Zhenhuanzhuan” 甄环传 is the immensely popular TV show The Legend of Zhenhuan, and is also an inspiration of many internet memes and jokes. “Huo”, the character for “fire”, means hot/popular. “Te” 特 means “very”.

The English reads: We (we) you hua le (optimized) the wandou (the peashooter) to make it look more adorable. In the Chinese subtitle, 萌 is the word used in place of adorable.

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“Yes, that’s our team, if the users like it we will go do it.”

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The “cut fruit” game is Fruit Ninja.

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In the brackets it says “Translation is so tiring, can I not?”

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“We noticed that PVZ1 has few male players in China.” Chedan 扯淡 means bullshitting, but the Chinese subtitle leaves the BS part out for comic relief.

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The Chinese for daisy here is 菊花, with the English actually being chrysanthemum. Its derivative meaning in slang and youth culture is “butthole”.

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He says, the reason we made the Chinese version of PVZ2 extremely difficult is that we took into consideration China’s economy

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Tong guan 通关, means pass all levels. Da liang de means loads of, lots of.

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Image courtesy of 天才小熊猫.