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A Billion Shoppers can’t be wrong

We take a look at huge crowds of shoppers in China over the last 30 years

12·18·2013

A Billion Shoppers can’t be wrong

We take a look at huge crowds of shoppers in China over the last 30 years

12·18·2013

They say shop til you drop and when it comes to shopping, the scale of competition in China is huge. We are talking about buying and selling in the world’s most populous country, where rivalry amongst shoppers trying to achieve their ideal purchase is glorified in a massive marathon where the winner never stands alone.

Below are some of the most intense shopping moments of the last thirty years via BackChina.com:

In 1983 Beijing Shopping Center, a massive crowd is buying clothes. Photo by CFP Wenlan Wang

1983, Beijing Shopping Center, a massive crowd is buying clothes.

In September 1988, a Wuhan jewelry store was fenced to keep off from the overcrowded costumers. Due to the current RMB Devaluation,the gold price rose up to more than 140 yuan per gram,  people hastily stormed their way to jewelry stores.Photo by CFP

September 1988, a Wuhan jewelry store was fenced to keep customers at bay. Due to RMB Devaluation,the gold price rose 140 RMB per gram, people hastily stormed into jewelry stores.

In August 1992, Investors in Shenzhen were waiting in the rain to purchase stocks.At that time the advance 5,000,000 stocks were available to purchase, but the draw sheet sold out in less than half the time, making it exclusively called  "The Millions Buyers War".

August 1992, investors in Shenzhen were waiting in the rain to purchase stocks. An advance 5,000,000 stocks were available for purchase, but the draw sheet sold out in less than half the time expected; it was dubbed “The Millions Buyers War”.

In March 2001, In Xian thousands of Shaanxi Guoli football die-hard fans were queuing to see the beloved team playing against Dalian Shide. More than 6000 fans were university students, hoping to be the first to cheer the home team,  some arrived in the stadium at 4 in the morning. Photo by CFP

March 2001, Xian, thousands of die-hard Shaanxi Guoli football fans queued to see their beloved team play against Dalian Shide. More than 6,000 fans were university students, hoping to be the first to cheer the home team, with some arriving in at 4 am.

In 2003 as Beijing announced the four SARS quarantine areas, people rushed to the supermarkets to buy life supplies, as the result, most commodities were disappeared from sight.Photo by CFP

In 2003 , Beijing announced the four SARS quarantine areas, people rushed to the supermarkets to buy supplies, as a result most commodities disappeared from sight.

In September 2006, a Beijing department store launched a two-hours "all things 5 yuan" purchase that attracted hundreds of costumers. at 10:00 in the morning the opened gate poured thousands of battle-ready costumers into the mall. in barely two minutes, the crowds were already seen to queue at the paying counter. Photo by CFP

September 2006, a Beijing department store launched a two-hours “all things 5 yuan” sale at 10:00 am. Thousands of battle-ready customers poured into store. In barely two minutes, crowds were queuing to pay.

panic salt

The salt radiation rumors in 2011 fueled widespread panic buying throughout the country.The picture displays Lanzhou citizens tightly packed in a supermarket to buy salt.

In January 2013, Beijingers lined up overnight in the middle of deep winter coldness outside the Sanlitun Apple store,awaiting to be the first to purchase the new iPhone 4s on the launching day in the morning.Photo by Feng Ling / Getty

January 2013, Beijingers queued overnight in the deep winter coldness outside the Sanlitun Apple store, to purchase the new iPhone 4s on launch day. Photo by Feng Ling / Getty

With a more than 1.3 billion population, China has established itself as a pioneer of hyper-competition when it comes to shopping: extreme shopping like no other place on earth. With crowds like this, no wonder Tabao is so popular!

Images courtesy of BackChina.com.