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Baldness an Epidemic Among Chinese Men

Add up the bald patches of Chinese men, and you'll get a quarter of Beijing's land area?

03·10·2015

Baldness an Epidemic Among Chinese Men

Add up the bald patches of Chinese men, and you'll get a quarter of Beijing's land area?

03·10·2015

Chinese once laughed at the receding hairlines of British men, but the joke has caught up with men in the Middle Kingdom. A picture of Li Yapeng, the ex-husband of pop diva Faye Wong, has brought the whole nation’s attention to the problem of male pattern baldness in China.

Li Yapeng in his youth

Li Yapeng in his youth

According to one survey, up to 25% of Chinese men suffer from baldness, Southcn reports. That means that out of 800 million Chinese men, 200 million are either bald or going bald. The survey also claims, somewhat dubiously, that this area of baldness would form an area as large as a quarter of Beijing, three quarters of Shanghai, one and a half of Hangzhou, or 1.3 times as large as Guangzhou.

The survey also shows that instead of seeking medical treatment, balding Chinese men usually put their trust in folk remedies, “secret remedies”, and hair and beauty products. Over 95 percent of them would not go get diagnosed.

The report goes on to say that Chinese are going bald at younger ages, which means that the majority of bald people are young and middle aged men. So why are increasing numbers of men going bald? Several major factors are listed:

1. Hereditary: Balding because of heredity usually starts at the age of 20 to 30.

2. Weak kidneys: Traditional Chinese Medicine believes that the main cause of baldness lies in the kidneys, that kidney health is a cornerstone of general health, and that hair is a product of the blood. Weak kidneys and a lack of blood supply can cause hair to shed.

3. Irregular lifestyle: lots of business luncheons, and staying up late. Smoking and drinking excessively.

4. High pressure

Many do question the validity of the survey, and how it stands today. The survey interviewed 5,779 men in five cities including Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Hangzhou. Considering these cities are all first-tier areas, with populations in the millions, whose lifestyles differ greatly for people in second and third-tier cities, let alone the vast rural areas in China, perhaps the sample isn’t that significant.

Li Yapeng on the other hand, has certainly changed.